Marching on to Free the Pū‘ali

The Wall

The Wall

Mangrove Hauling Sled

Mangrove Hauling Sledge

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Faced by a massive wall of red mangrove, deep tangles of hau, and mud that can swallow half of your leg, our Mālama Hulē‘ia volunteer army continued to march toward the Pū‘ali Stream. On the weekend of August 16-17, we employed all the weapons we had, plus a couple of new ones. We had brush cutters and chain saws buzzing. We extended our walkway even further over the mud.  We loaded up carts and pushed them to where the chipper could grind up the mangrove and hau branches. We cut down and chained up whole trees and dragged them out of the mud with a truck on dry ground. And we put a couple of truck bed liners to good use as a sledges for hauling the cut up mangrove.

We made good progress in clearing mangrove and other invasive plants bordering the Pū‘ali. Although the challenge of completely eliminating these invaders and freeing the Pū‘ali remains great, we can prevail by practicing our motto: Ho‘omoe wai kāhi ke kāo‘o (Let all travel together like water flowing in one direction.) In the end, the power of wai will be on our side.

Mahalo to all of our volunteer warriors for taking on this battle with the red mangrove, especially to those who have helped before. Big mahalo to the Kane Ohana, including Durgh and Pomai Kane, who after all these years with the Kaiola Canoe Club, still demonstrate that there is more to being in an outrigger canoe club than paddling.  Also big mahalo to Dennis Chun, who took time off from his neighboring project in Nawiliwili, Nā Kalai Waʻa ʻO Kauaʻi – Namahoe, to help us with ours.

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Drone Pictures Reveal Mangrove Extent

This gallery contains 11 photos.

On August 4, 2014, thanks to Joel Guy, we were able to get aerial views of the red mangrove growing along the upper banks of the Hulē‘ia.  We paddled his drone up the river to about 1/4 mile past the S-turn and … Continue reading

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BC Buds (Buddies) Bring Aloha from Canada

BC Buds

BC Buds still clean

Getting Dirty

Getting dirty

The team of paddlers who call themselves BC Buds may have been disappointed by not being able to compete in the storm-cancelled Napali Challenge. But that did not change their positive attitude and aloha spirit as they buddied up to pull hau branches from the mud and plant native ‘uki and ‘ae ‘ae in our Niumalu site on August 6, 2014.

The men and women crews included paddlers from the Ocean River Paddling Club, the False Creek Racing Canoe Club and the Kamloops Wailua Outrigger Club, all located in British Columbia, Canada. Mahalo to these paddlers for coming so far and helping to rid the Pū‘ali and Hulē‘ia of red mangrove and other invasive plants. Mahalo also to Keone and Dana Miyake for connecting them with Mālama Hulē‘ia.

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Make Up Work Day This Sunday

Wali came and went without disturbing Niumalu very much. It did, however, disturb our mangrove clearing work schedule, and we really need to make up for that.  If you can spare the time, please kokua.  We will be working the Mālama Hulē‘ia project site from 8:30 AM to noon.  Then we break for lunch and a Steering Committee meeting.

There will be a low tide Sunday morning, so the land should be dryer than it was last Sunday, when the ‘alae‘ula and cattle egrets had the place for themselves:

7-20-14

7-20-14

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Workday Rescheduled

Hazardous Weather Conditions

Due to the heavy rain expected, today’s mangrove clearing is rescheduled until next Sunday, 7/27/14.  If you can make it then, please join us. There is much red mangrove and other invasive plants that remain at our Niumalu project site, and we can use all the help we can get. Mahalo to all  who helped yesterday.

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Ka ‘Aha Hula ‘O Halauaola Participants Help to Replant

Hula dancers came from California, Washington, Virginia, and parts of Kauai to attend the 2014 World Hula Conference, as well as to spend some quality in Niumalu with Mālama Hulē‘ia.  After helping to pull out the Indian fleabane weeds, and replanting with  ʻaeʻae, ʻākulikuli, ʻahu ʻawa, , kīpūkai, and ʻuki, the dancers feasted on an ono lunch featuring Calvin Ho’s kalo poki.  Then everyone got into a couple of double hull canoes and paddled up the Hulē‘ia to see first hand the harm that red mangrove is doing to our river and the ‘Alekoko fish pond.

Mahalo nui loa to the 21 hula dancers who demonstrated great aloha ‘āina by helping our project. Mahalo also to Calvin and Katherine Ho for coordinating and making this event possible.

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Another Good MH Weekend

Mahalo to all the volunteers that helped mālama wai and mālama ‘aina this past weekend (June 21 & 22, 2014).

Going

Going

Gone!

Gone!

Our big objective for the weekend was to clear all the mangrove in the Pū‘ali Stream mauka of the one lane Niumalu Road bridge. There were only a few trees there, but they were well anchored in the stream, and the task of taking them out turned out to be much harder than anticipated. But thanks to the persistent efforts of core workers Buddy, Steve, Jan, and Carl, as well as the pulling power of Jan’s 4 wheel drive truck with trailer hitch, we accomplished our goal. Just in time too, because one of the trees was full of propagules (baby trees) that would have spread the infestation further. This completes one important segment of the areas we have targeted for mangrove eradication in phase 2 of our project. It is important because it involves working directly with a private land owner for the first time.  We are grateful to George Costa and Mizutani family for allowing us to work on their property.

While some of us were working in the stream, others were taking care of the land on the park side of the road.  Joe Currameng had a brush cutter whining at full speed as he cut down the giant guinea grass stream side of the park.  Pepe was in the mud and mangrove taking down some big trees. On Saturday, volunteers Sheena Wise and Nadia Kaley took care of picking up and carrying mangrove branches and roots to the bin. And on Sunday volunteers Noelani and Lehia Pomroy, Cory Dotario and family, Derek Kessler and family and co-workers from Keoki’s Paradise, Kimi and Rush Akeo, all took on the hard job of transporting the cut stuff to the chipper, which was manned as usual by Yosh.

Tidal Challenge

Tidal Challenge

The end result of all this effort is a wide open space between the mangrove and our boardwalk. And since this area is flooded by every high tide, removal of the cut material has become very challenging.  We may need another visit by the menehune to move the boardwalk again. Or we may need to extend the boardwalk and cut further down toward the Small Boat Harbor Point.

Mahalo also to those who generously took care of keeping us fueled: Pomai and Amber Kane and Sam Chapin on Saturday, and Barbara Prige and Aunty Apaka on Sunday.  Needless to say, there was way more ono food and drink than we could consume.

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