Replanting

Niumalu 1 18 14gaOn land cleared of red mangrove and other alien species, Mālama Hulē‘ia will replant with appropriate native Hawaiian and Polynesian-introduced plants. To be appropriate, the plants must biologically fit the the intended environment.  In most areas around the estuary of the Hulē‘ia, for example, this means that the plants must be salt tolerant and capable of growing in wet land, sometimes in the water.  Equally important, we will replant with plants that are historically and culturally appropriate.  This means that the plants should be known by and/or used by Hawaiians prior to the introduction of other plants by non-Hawaiians.  So these either will be indigenous or native plants, or they will be “canoe” plants – those brought over by the early Polynesian settlers of Hawaii.

We start with the plants already found in our demonstration project site between the Pu‘ali Stream and the Niumalu Beach Park (pictured above after 7 months of mangrove eradication work). We assume that the plants currently growing there are biologically appropriate for the site. But there are many plants at the site that are not historically or culturally appropriate, including the red mangrove.  Here are the plants we found there:

Non-native
California grass Brachiaria mutica
Christmasberry Schinus terebinthifolius
Guinea grass Panicum maximum
Hairypod cowpea vine Vigna luteola
Haole koa Leucaena leucocephala
Honohono grass Commelina diffusa
Indian fleabane Pluchea indica
Ironwood Casuarina equisetifolia
Java plum Syzygium cumini
Octopus tree Schefflera actinophylla
Red Mangrove Rhizophora mangle
Seashore paspalum Paspalum vaginatum
Sour bush Pluchea carolinensis
Wedelia Sphagneticola trilobata
Areca palm Dypsis lutescens
Chinese fan palm Livistona chinensis
Feather Palm – skinny leaf Archontophoenix alexandrae
Feather Palm – fat leaf Ptychosperma macarthurii
Native or Polynesian-introduced
 ‘Ae’ae Bacopa monnieri
 ‘Akulikuli Sesuvium portulacastrum
Hau Hibiscus tiliaceus
Kipukai, Nena Heliotropium currasavicum
Milo Thespesia populnea
Niu, coconut Cocos nucifera

As we eradicate the red mangrove from this site, we will also eradicate all other non-native and non-canoe plants, with the possible temporary exception of the Seashore paspalum. This grass, which is better know locally as “opae grass,” is one of few that can grow well directly in brackish water.  So until we can find a good replacement, it will remain to minimize soil erosion.

Niu

Niu

Milo

Milo

Hau

Hau

Hau, Milo and Niu were brought with the voyaging Polynesians. But Hau is invasive and will also have to be eliminated or somehow controlled. Milo is mildly invasive too, and we are cutting it back to only the best looking trees. Niu may present future management problems, but in this place called Niumalu (coconut tree shade), it seems highly appropriate to allow it to grow.

One of our aims for the demonstration site has been to open up the view plane looking makai from the Niumalu Beach Park.  To achieve this goal, our replanting will include some trees for framing the views, but will involve mostly ground covers, sedges and low bushes.

First, we will keep the space open by helping the existing ground covers to spread, planting ‘akulikuli, ‘ae‘ae and kipukai in areas similar to those they currently occupy.

'Akulikuli

‘Akulikuli

'Ae'ae

‘Ae’ae

Kipukai

Kipukai

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Then we will introduce grasses, sedges, shrubs and trees in places where they grow best and will best contribute to making the site attractive to both wildlife and people.  We will strive for landscaping that looks and feels natural.  Below are some of the candidate plants:

Grasses / Sedges:

Makaloa

Makaloa

'Uki

‘Uki

'Aki'aki

‘Aki’aki

Ahu'awa

Ahu’awa

Shrubs:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ilima

Naupaka kahakai

Naupaka kahakai

Hinahina

Hinahina

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Trees:

Hala

Hala

Kamani

Kamani

Kou

Kou

2 Responses to Replanting

  1. Thankfulness to my father who shared with me about this web site,
    this website is genuinely remarkable.

  2. Lyn Wandell says:

    Would like to get updates to volunteer. When and where. Directions to get there.

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