Feeling Good about the Pū‘ali Wetland

Let us call it that – the Pū‘ali Wetland. Our demonstration project site has decided that it will be a true Hawaiian tidal wetland – fed by the Pū‘ali Stream and tides of the Hulē‘ia estuary, and populated by native birds and plants. This may not be exactly what we thought we were creating when we started to clear red mangrove from the site. But it is clearly what the place has in mind now.

There is still a lot more work needed by the Pū‘ali Wetland, and we have a community workday coming up this Saturday, October 17. We will doing more cleanup and still more to eradicate invasive plants. Besides yanking mangrove seedlings, we will be ridding the place of alien grasses (California grass, guinea grass, seashore paspalum). We will also be transplanting and spreading the native ground cover and sedges that are growing so well there, especially the ‘ae’ae, makaloa, and another native flatsedge (puʻukaʻa?)

While eradicating mangrove called for hard work with a fair amount of aggression, the work called for at this time feels more nurturing. It feels good. This is because we can now clearly see how our efforts are helping native plants and animals to flurish in the wetland. Moreover, the malama we give is making the Pū‘ali Wetland into a place of real beauty.

Puali Wetland today 10-14-15

Puali Wetland today, 10-14-15

Below are some comparative and relatively recent scenes of and at the Pū‘ali Wetland, with overdue thanks:

Google Earth Jan 2014?

Google Earth, Jan 2014?

Mahalo County Planning Dept.

Kauai County Planning Dept., 6-25-15

Mahalo to all from Kauai Invasive Species Committee who helped on July 18, 2015.

Mahalo to all from Kauai Invasive Species Committee who helped on July 18, 2015.

Mahalo for the many days worked by the Menehune

Mahalo for the many days of creative and productive work by the Menehune

Mahalo to Jimmy Nakamura for cleaning up the slopes.

Mahalo to Jimmy Nakamura for cleaning up the slopes of the park on 9-19-15.

DLNR visits on Sept. 24, 2015. First Deputy Kekoa Kaluhiwa checks out the akulekule while Carl Berg explains the Puali Wetland to Chair Suzanne Case.

Mahalo to DLNR for their attention on 9- 24-15. First Deputy Kekoa Kaluhiwa checks out the akulekule while Carl Berg explains everything about the Pū‘ali Wetland to Chair Suzanne Case.

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